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This week the Changing Markets Foundation, along with Stand Earth, wrote to the CEOs of the 20 biggest fashion brands in the world with demands that they halve the amount of fossil fuel they use in their materials by 2030, with oil and gas commonly used by brands to create synthetic materials such as polyester.

Meanwhile Fleur Anderson MP proposed a new Bill which will see legislation introduced to prohibit the manufacture and sale of plastic wet wipes. Around 90 percent of the 11 billion wet wipes used in the UK every year contain some form of plastic that turns into microplastics when broken down, the Labour MP said.

In other news, the University of Portsmouth announced its Global Plastics Policy Centre at COP26. The Centre will help find sustainable solutions to tackle plastic pollution around the world

As always, we hope you enjoy reading.

John Higginson
Editor-in-Chief
Plastic Free Post

Fashion industry must end addiction to fossil fuels

CEOs of the 20 biggest fashion brands in the world have been contacted by Changing Markets and Stand Earth with demands that they halve the amount of fossil fuel they use in materials by 2030. Nike, Primark, Patagonia and ASOS are among those named in Changing Markets Foundation’s Synthetics Anonymous report. The foundation is demanding complete transparency on their use of fossil fuels in the next 12 months – with oil and gas most commonly being used by brands to create synthetic materials such as polyester. Changing Markets found synthetic fibres represent over two-thirds (69 percent) of all materials used in textiles, requiring more oil than the annual consumption of Spain.

Read more here.

Labour MP proposes new law banning all wet wipes containing plastic

A Labour MP is calling for a new law to ban all wet wipes that contain plastic. Fleur Anderson’s Bill proposes to prohibit the manufacture and sale of wet wipes containing plastic and had its first reading on Tuesday. Around 90 percent of the 11 billion wet wipes used in the UK every year contain some form of plastic that turns into microplastics when broken down, Ms Anderson claims, which can ultimately be ingested by wildlife and enter the food chain and water supply.

Read more here.

New global plastics policy centre announced during COP26 

The University of Portsmouth announced its Global Plastics Policy Centre (GPPC) at COP26 yesterday to help find sustainable solutions to tackle plastic pollution around the world. Designed to give governments and industry groups the evidence needed to make better decisions around plastic policies, University researchers believe this unique resource will ultimately help reduce the negative impacts of plastics. The GPPC is the latest significant development from the Revolutions Plastics initiative.

Read more here.

Bacardi Cuts Plastic in Gift Packs by 50 percent

Bacardi has announced its holiday season range of gift packs will contain 50 percent less plastic than last year. Bacardi is removing a total of 147 tons of single-use plastic used annually in its gift packs through innovative new designs, which remove the need for plastic, and by replacing plastic inserts or trays with sustainable alternatives made from cardboard certified by the Forest Stewardship Council. This year’s 50 percent cut is a step towards Bacardi achieving its 2023 goal of removing 100 percent of all single-use plastic from its gift packs and point-of-sale materials, and the company’s 2030 goal of being 100 percent plastic free.

Read more here.

Tri-Star Packaging introduces home compostable kraft food boxes

Tri-Star Packaging has introduced new kraft food boxes lined with Notpla Coating, a special lining made from seaweed, which replaces the plastic coating usually used on foodservice products. According to Tri-Star, Notpla Coating does not require specific recycling pathways or specialised industrial composting equipment to degrade. It takes less than six weeks to completely decompose in a home composting environment. The Notpla coating is made from one of nature’s most renewable resources, brown seaweed, which grows up to 1 metre per day. Seaweed doesn’t compete with food crops and doesn’t need fresh water or fertiliser.

Read more here.

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