News + Views

Plastic Free Post

Back to News + Views

Dear Reader,

This week the world’s leading scientists, campaigners, and legal experts convened at the Plastic Health Summit 2021 in Amsterdam to assess the impact of plastic on human health. Organised by Plastic Soup Foundation, those at the summit made the case for how environmental and human health are intimately connected.

Meanwhile, a new report was released this week to help the design industry and brand owners use compostable materials correctly as an alternative to plastic packaging.

The report was developed by A Plastic Planet and supported by materials experts and academics, with the guidance calling for compostables to be used only when their end-of-life is designed to facilitate the movement of food waste into composting streams.

As always, we hope you enjoy reading.

John Higginson
Editor-in-Chief
Plastic Free Post

Plastic Health Summit 2021 exposes impact of plastic on human health

The world’s leading scientists, campaigners, and legal experts convened this week at the Plastic Health Summit 2021 to assess the impact of plastic on human health. The summit saw a host of academics share research outlining the environmental and health impact of plastic pollution, including research on the impact of airborne microplastics, as well as new findings which found plastic in the blood of farm animals. The theme of the summit was OneHealth, making the case that environmental and human health are intimately connected.

Read more here.

Landmark report outlining correct use of compostable packaging released

A landmark new report was released this week to help inform the design industry and brand owners on the right use of compostable materials as an alternative for plastic packaging. Developed by international solutions organisation A Plastic Planet and supported by materials experts and academics, The Red & Green List is designed to provide guidance for a range of stakeholders including packaging designers, consumer goods industry, governments, retailers and businesses. The paper calls for the usage of compostables only when their end-of-life is designed in order to facilitate the movement of food waste into the composting waste stream, reduce levels of soil pollution, and aid in the regeneration of soil.

Read more here.

Nine years to save the world from plastic environmentalists say 

Humankind has just nine years to save the world from plastic waste before irreparable damage is done to the planet and human health, campaigners have told a global meeting of scientists.  Plastic Soup Foundation Director Maria Westerbos said that by 2030 the harm caused by plastic pollution to human health and the planet would be irreversible.  And she called on the World Health Organization to declare plastic waste a public health emergency. The comments were made at the Plastic Health Summit in Amsterdam.

Read more here.

Sainsbury’s removes 15 tonnes of plastic from Halloween range 

Sainsbury’s has significantly reduced the amount of plastic used across its range of decorative Halloween items by eliminating plastic lamination from its paper plates and bowls range. The retailer has also redesigned its trick or treat buckets to be made using paper instead of plastic and has swapped plastic packaging out of some popular items including spooky wreaths, signs and lights. The move means Sainsbury’s is eliminating over 15 tonnes of plastic from circulation. 

Read more here.

US environmental study claims risk from phthalates in food packaging

A new study by a US journal claims phthalates (PFAS) chemicals found in plastic food packaging and other consumer goods are causing tens of thousands of deaths annually in the USA. Phthalates, also known as plasticizers, are a group of chemicals that make plastic more durable. Environmental Pollution is an international peer-reviewed journal that publishes research papers and review articles, and its study claims there is a link between PFAS chemicals  in plastic food packaging and other consumer goods and deaths in the USA. The study said phthalates are used in food packaging, as well as shampoos, nail polish, creams, and even baby lotions.

Read more here.

PLASTIC-FREE POST

    Sign up to our weekly round-up of plastic free stories

    Feel free to get in touch at hello@higginsonstrategy.com if you have any questions or plastic free stories to contribute.