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Dear Reader,

This week environmental campaign groups warned that the UK is falling behind the rest of Europe in combating the plastic crisis. The group wrote an open letter to Environment Minister Rebecca Pow urging her to match the ban of items outlined in Article 5 of the EU Single-Use Directive.

In California a landmark bill to combat plastic pollution was approved by the state legislature for the November 2022 ballot. The bill will focus on regulations to reduce plastic packaging whilst ensuring that packaging will be recyclable, reusable or compostable.

In other news, Iceland Foods is trialling paper and cartonboard packaging for its potato and fish products in a bid to reduce plastic pollution. The new potato packaging has launched in 33 stores in London while the fish packaging is being trialled in 17 stores in the Manchester area.

As always, we hope you enjoy reading.

John Higginson
Editor-in-Chief
Plastic Free Post

Environmental groups call on UK Government to ban polluting plastics

An alliance of environmental organisations has warned that the UK is falling behind the rest of Europe in tackling plastic pollution. In an open letter to Environment Minister Rebecca Pow, 21 organisations including Greenpeace, City to Sea, Keep Britain Tidy, and Friends of the Earth subsequently urged the UK Government to match the ban of items outlined in Article 5 of the EU Single-Use Directive, at the very least. Earlier this month, the Directive, which will see the most polluting single-use plastic banned, was scheduled to be incorporated into national law and applied across all EU countries. Despite claims to be world-leading on the plastic pollution problem, the UK Government has so far chosen not to legislate the same bans, whilst being the only European country in the top 10 plastic polluters.

Read more here.

Anti-plastic waste initiative qualified for California ballot

A landmark bill to combat plastic pollution was approved by the California state legislature for the November 2022 ballot. The California state legislature approved an anti-plastic waste initiative for the November 2022 ballot. County election officers were notified by Secretary of State Shirley Weber that the measure had garnered more than 623,212 petition signatures, the minimum the state requires for the measure to go before voters next year. The initiative would have the state implement regulations to reduce plastic packaging whilst ensuring that said packaging will be recyclable, reusable or compostable.

Read more here.

Iceland trials reduced plastic and ‘plastic-free’ potato and fish packs

Iceland is trialling paper potato packaging and fish in packs predominantly made of cartonboard in a bid to tackle plastic pollution. The frozen food retailer is now selling its British White Potatoes in paper bags and its packs of four Atlantic Cod Fillets and eight other fish lines in boxes made largely of cartonboard, containing 90 percent less plastic than the previous packaging. The new potato packaging has launched in 33 stores in London while the fish packaging is being trialled in 17 stores in the Manchester area. The retailer said its latest “plastic-free” initiatives on potatoes and fish could save up to 96 tonnes of plastic a year, with the new fish packaging alternative alone having the potential to save up to 84 tonnes of plastic.

Read more here.

Isle of Man plastic-free businesses to be celebrated in new scheme

A new scheme is being launched to celebrate businesses in the Isle of Man that have removed the use of single use plastic items. The Plastic Free Business Scheme will be run by beach cleaning charity Beach Buddies, in collaboration with the Government. Businesses that join the scheme will be presented with certificates and window stickers to display, and provided with support and advice in making practical changes. The stickers will make businesses easily identifiable to potential customers, allowing the public to make informed choices about the businesses they support.

Read more here.

McDonald’s to trial deposit return scheme for coffee cups in Northampton

McDonald’s has chosen six restaurants in Northampton to trial a £1 deposit on reusable coffee cups in a bid to cut back on waste. In September 2020, McDonald’s launched a new global partnership to utilise the Loop collection model from TerraCycle that will see reusable and returnable cups trialled to cut back on single-use plastics. The company has this week confirmed that restaurants in the Northampton area will trial this new system. Customers using the restaurants or Drive-Thru can pay a £1 deposit that is redeemed if they return the cup to a participating McDonald’s UK restaurant so that it can be washed and sanitised to be reused again. Those that do will receive 20p off their next medium hot drink order.

Read more here.

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